"Ask Me Anything" with Dr. Krupa Playforth, MD, FAAP

11112131517

Comments

  • @SD123 Once they are able to roll both ways, you do not need to go in and flip them over. Many babies prefer to sleep on their bellies. I would still place them on their back, but then if they roll over, you don't need to intervene.

  • @Pheebs I have another answer on this -- but I would recommend focusing on responsive feeding and taking the pressure off the meal. Increased pickiness is completely appropriate for this age, and unfortunately vgetting into a battle of wills makes mealtimes emotional and stressful for everyone. If you are concerned about your child's growth then talk to your pediatrician, but otherwise I would try a period of 2-4 weeks where you back off and let them lead the way. They may surprise you! (Also be very careful you arent using milk as a crutch on days when your child didnt eat as well - you can end up in a picky eating cycle when getting >16-22oz of whole milk per day). I have posts on this as well as what is normal picky eating in this age group, and on the "division of responsibility" approach to eating that I recommend.

  • @Jmcw4cy I have a few other answers on t his! I'm planning to do a series of posts on intrroducing solids int he coming few weeks (my little one is 5.5months old) - I have a lot of thoughts on BLW and purees. In general, as in most things, there is no single "right answer" - different babies have different needs. There are a lot of positives to BLW, though, and my favorite resource is a book I helped to put together along with several other experts (a pediatric allergist, pediatric dietitian, pediatric speech therapist, etc) called "101 before one"

  • KrupaPlayforthMD
    KrupaPlayforthMD Member, Expert
    edited August 17

    @TMcDade Although some asymmetry can be within the range of normal, it is important to discuss this with your pediatrician. Particularly with infants who have a history of breech birth (but even infants who do not), ruling out hip dysplasia is essential.

  • @SkyBlueStarLight Kids in daycare get sick frequently, as do infants with toddler siblings. I expect about an illness a month in the first year or two, and this time of year those tend to be upper respiratory illnesses. Interestingly, for those children who do not go to daycare, they get the same illnesses - just later, when they start school.

    As for immune "boosting" -- in my experience, many companies sell supplements without sufficient evidence or regulation, and try to take advantage of worried parents. Our immune systems are smart. They do not need to be "boosted". There are certainly things we can do to optimize health, and to minimize illness - many of them aren't ****, though. Hand washing, healthy diets, good sleep, etc.

    I have posts on immune boosting, evidence-based strategies to optimize your child's health, and ways to minimize daycare illnesses, as well as when you should be worried about "too many" illnesses from daycare. All are on my instagram!

  • KrupaPlayforthMD
    KrupaPlayforthMD Member, Expert
    edited August 17

    Hi @Tissuedad1, I shared the following response to a similar question on the "Ask Me Anything" thread that may be helpful to you:

    Kids in daycare get sick frequently, as do infants with toddler siblings. I expect about an illness a month in the first year or two, and this time of year those tend to be upper respiratory illnesses. Interestingly, for those children who do not go to daycare, they get the same illnesses - just later, when they start school.

    As for immune "boosting" -- in my experience, many companies sell supplements without sufficient evidence or regulation, and try to take advantage of worried parents. Our immune systems are smart. They do not need to be "boosted". There are certainly things we can do to optimize health, and to minimize illness - many of them aren't ****, though. Hand washing, healthy diets, good sleep, etc.

    I have posts on immune boosting, evidence-based strategies to optimize your child's health, and ways to minimize daycare illnesses, as well as when you should be worried about "too many" illnesses from daycare. All are on my instagram!

  • @Geoff_L In most cases, this should not cause long-term issues. However, without more specifics and an exam, hard to say! I wouldn't worry too much at this point. Not sure how old your child is, but if you are concerned, trust your gut and talk to your pediatrician!

  • @Catahoulamom I have another answer on this topic (see my response two comments above this one), as well as as series of posts on my instagram discussing what to expect after your child starts daycare. Briefly, we expect about an illness a month for the first year, and this time of year they tend to respiratory illnesses. Check out my posts for more about ways to optimize your child's health and what red flags to watch for/when to be concerned about "too many" illnesses.

  • @Weaver Check out my comments in this thread above, in response to SkyBlueStarLight and Catahoulamom. You can also check out my instagram for more about ways to optimize your child's health and what red flags to watch for/when to be concerned about "too many" illnesses.

  • KrupaPlayforthMD
    KrupaPlayforthMD Member, Expert
    edited August 17

    Hi @LawMama873, please discuss this with your pediatrician!

This thread has been closed. We hope you'll join the conversation by posting to an open thread or starting a new one.